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2.  Revised 2003 from: Legner, E. F.  1961.  An ecological study of some foliage-feeding insects on young nonbearing apple trees in Wisconsin.  Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin, Madison.  139 pp.

 

   Title Page         Acknowledgments        Contents        Tables & Figures       Introduction

 

SUMMARY

 

          The years 1959 and 1960 were phenologically similar, judging from occurrence of insects in the orchard and development of the trees.  Seventeen species in nine families of Lepidoptera were collected from the apple orchard in 1959 and 33 species in 19 families in 1960.  All species except Dichomeria liguella (Hbn.), collected in 1959, were present in 1960.  Four species occurred in two generations.  All other species had a single generation.  See Page 43 for all species present.

 

          Tree variety, treatment, and year apparently influenced the number of individuals and species present.  The three primary destructive species were significantly more abundant on Red Delicious than on Cortland apple varieties, and there were more individuals collected per tree in 1960 than in 1959.  There were significantly fewer eye-spotted bud moth larvae and pupae in the treated section over both varieties in 1959 only.  The distribution of eye-spotted bud moth larvae became uniform between the four orchard sections during the latter part of September 1960.  Fruit-tree leaf roller larvae and pupae apparently occurred at higher numbers in the check section.  There were no significant differences between treatments for the red-banded leaf roller in either year.  Apple aphids were more abundant in the check section of the orchard in 1959, but were distributed at random over all sections in 1960.

 

 

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